Spring 2015

 

 

PSYC 65

Systems Neuroscience with Laboratory (2 sections)

In 15S:10—Jeffrey Taube, Kyle Smith

The primary focus of this course is the physiological basis of behavior from a systems perspective. Such topics as localization of function, neural models, and the physiological bases of sensory/motor systems, learning/memory, and spatial cognition are considered. The laboratory introduces the student to the anatomy and physiology of the mammalian central nervous system and to some of the principal techniques used in systems and behavioral neuroscience. A single laboratory section will be held Tuesday afternoons in the spring 2013. In the spring 2013, two laboratory sections will be scheduled for a 3.5 hour period on either Tuesday morning or afternoons; students will be assigned to one of these two laboratory sections. Prerequisite: Psych 1 or 6 and 26 or 45 or Biology 34 and permission through the department website. Dist: SLA.

PSYC 83

The Self

In 15S:2A—Todd Heatherton

A unitary sense of self that exists across time and place is a central feature of human experience.  Understanding the nature of self-what it is and what it does-has challenged scholars for many centuries.  Although most people intuitively understand what is meant by the term self, definitiions have tended toward the philosophical and metaphysical. Efforts at creating more formal definitions have largely been unsuccessful, as many features of self are empirically murky, difficult to identify and assess using objective methods.  Yet the phenomenological experience of self if highly familiar to everyone.  So, at issue is not whether the self exists, but how best to study it.  This course will survey contemporary approaches to understanding the self, with a strong emphasis on approaches from social psychology.  We will consider self's development, its cognitive and affective components, motives related to it, and how it is regulated.  We will consider its functional basis, examining components, motives related to it, and how it is regulated.  We will consider its functional basis, examining both its adaptive and maladaptive consequences.  We will also examine its neurological basis, including case studies of people with disorders of self.  Prerequisities:  Psyc 1, 23 and permission through the department website.

 

COURSE CLOSED

PSYC 85

Cognitive Neuroscience Seminar: Development, Learning and Disorders

In 15S: 10A—Ming Meng

Understanding how the human brain develops and learns to process and organize information is one of the fundamental challenges in cognitive neuroscience. This seminar will cover topics of infants' development as well as neural plasticity in adolescents and adults. We will focus on visual and auditory development, including visual acuity, color vision, depth perception, object and face perception, auditory sensitivity, and speech perception. Case studies of atypical development and developmental disorders will also be discussed, with emphasis on how these studies can help us to understand the normal developmental process. No textbook will be assigned for this course. Students are expected to review current trends in cognitive neuroscience literature. Throughout the course students will also develop critical thinking skills needed to effectively evaluate research.   Permission through the department website.

 

 

COURSE CLOSED

PSYC 87

Nature and Nurture

One of the continuing discussions of our era is whether differences beetween individuals can be attributed to inherent characteristics or to environmental influences, in other words, the nature-nurture debate.  We will examine writings representing the spectrum of arguments, particularly those taking modern combinatorial or interactionist positions.  Analyses of both animal and human behaviors will be included.  Students will select a particular behavioral domain of interest to them and review current information about the sources of variation in that behavior.   Permission through the department website.

 

COURSE CLOSED

PSYC 88

Independent Research

The course is designed to enable specifically qualified students, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory or field research under the direction of a faculty member.  Students may take up to three terms of Independent Research. However, no more than two terms of 88, 89, or a combination of 88s and 89s may count toward the eight required courses for the major. Normally a student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 both overall and in the major to enroll.

Notes:

PSYC 89

Honors Research

This course is designed to enable especially qualified students, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory or field research under the direction of a faculty member. Students may take two or three terms of Honors Research, but no more than two terms of 88, 89, or a combination of 88s and 89s may count toward the eight required courses for the major. This course may not be used to fulfill the upper-level (60 or above) major requirement. A student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.30 in the major and 3.0 overall to enroll and must enroll before the end of the Fall term of their Senior year. Honors theses will be evaluated by a two-person Thesis Committee approved by the Undergraduate Committee. Thesis Committee members must be identified prior to the student signing up for Psych 89. The Thesis Committee must include a regular member of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences faculty. The other individual, if not a regular member of PBS, must have an active academic appointment (e.g., Research Associate, Research Assistant Professor, Medical School Faculty, Faculty in other departments of the College, for instance). Either Committee member may serve as the primary advisor. The two members of the Thesis Committee may not be in the same laboratory. The Thesis Committee will read and evaluate the thesis and oral presentation, and make recommendations to the Undergraduate Committee regarding the awarding of Honors or High Honors. In addition, all Honors students will present their work in a departmental symposium at the conclusion of the Spring term. The Thesis Committee will also recommend in writing meritorious students to the Undergraduate Committee for consideration for the various departmental prizes. Two terms of this course are required of those who seek to graduate with Honors in Psychology.

Potential sources of funds for independent research may be found in the description of The Filene and Benner Fellowships for Independent Research and on the Undergraduate Advising & Research web site.

Prerequisite: Psych 1, 10 and 11. A sixty level course is strongly recommended. Students should check well in advance with their faculty advisor for additional prerequisites. Written permission from the advisor, and then written permission from the Chairman of the Undergraduate Committee (for 09-10, Professor Catherine Cramer).

Checklist for enrolling in Honors Independent Research, PSYC 89. Be sure to read the Expectations and Procedures for Honors in Psychology, to help you design and conduct a successful Honors Major.

PSYC 90

Independent Neuroscience Research

This course is designed to enable Neuroscience majors to engage in independent laboratory research under the direction of a neuroscience faculty member. This course is suitable to use for your culminating experience, but cannot be used to fulfill the elective requirement for the Neuroscience major. Students may take up to two terms of independent research. Students are required to write a final report of their research.

Prerequisite: Psychology 6, and 10. A completed Checklist for Independent Study form along with the signed permission from the advisor on the form should be submitted to the PBS Department office. The Neuroscience Steering Committee will evaluate and approve the application.

PSYC 91

Honors Neuroscience Research

This course is designed to enable especially qualified Neuroscience majors, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory research under the direction of a neuroscience faculty member. Students must take at least two terms of Psychology 91. A student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.30 in the major and 3.00 overall to enroll and must enroll by the Fall term of the senior year. The honors thesis will be evaluated by a two-person thesis committee approved by the Neuroscience Steering Committee. Thesis committee members must be identified prior to the student signing up for Psychology 91. The thesis committee must include a regular faculty member of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. The other individual must have an active academic appointment at Dartmouth. A prospectus of proposed research is due by the end of the Fall term for approval by the Neuroscience Steering Committee. The student is expected to submit a written thesis, give a public presentation and pass an oral examination administered by the thesis committee. The thesis committee will make recommendations to the Neuroscience Steering Committee regarding the awarding of Honors or High Honors.

Prerequisite: Psychology 6, and 10. A 60s level course is strongly recommended. Students should check well in advance with their faculty advisor for additional prerequisites.  A completed Checklist for Honor's Thesis form along with the signed permission.