Fall 2016

Permission forms will be accepted for Fall 2016 courses beginning on May 1, 2016.

PSYC 60

Principles of Human Brain Mapping with fMRI

In 16F at 2A — William Kelley

This course is designed to introduce students to the theoretical and practical issues involved in conducting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments of cognitive and behaviorally-related brain activity. Participants will gain an understanding of the physiological principles underlying the fMRI signal change, as well as the considerations for experimental design. The course will include firsthand exposure to the scanning environment and data collection procedures. Participants will be provided conceptual and hands-on experience with image processing and statistical analysis. At the completion of this course, it is expected that participants will be prepared to critique, design and conduct fMRI studies; appreciate limitations and potentials of current fMRI methods and techniques; and better understand the broad range of expertise required in an fMRI research program. The course is designed to provide the participant with intensive, hands-on instruction. As a result, enrollment in the course will be limited to 12 people. Knowledge of MR physics, signal processing, or the UNIX/Linux operating system is not a prerequisite.
Permission through the department website.  Approved elective for the Neuroscience major/minor.

PSYC 65

Systems Neuroscience with Laboratory

In 16F at 10 — Robert Maue

The primary focus of this course is the physiological basis of behavior from a systems perspective. Such topics as localization of function, neural models, and the physiological bases of sensory/motor systems, learning/memory, and spatial cognition are considered. The laboratory introduces the student to the anatomy and physiology of the mammalian central nervous system and to some of the principal techniques used in systems and behavioral neuroscience. Laboratory sections are scheduled for Tuesdays 9:00am-12:00pm, Tuesdays 1:30-4:30pm, Wednesdays 1:45-4:45pm, or Thursdays 1:30-4:30pm. Students will be assigned to one of these four laboratory sections.
Prerequisite: One of the following three PSYC 6, PSYC 26 or BIOL 34; and permission through the department website.

PSYC 84.04

Clinical Science Practicum

In 16F at 2A William Hudenko

This course is designed to provide students with an experiential learning opportunity by applying knowledge and skills gained in the classroom to actual work settings while under both site and academic supervision.  Students who have an interest in clinical psychology will learn about the different facets of working in a social service, mental health, or other community setting while assessing their own skills and suitability for this kind of graduate work or employment experience.   Students will spend up to 10 hours/week at their practicum site and will be mentored onsite.  Additional supervision will be provided by a clinical science faculty member during regularly scheduled class times and didactic instruction will be offered to complement and enhance work that is completed at practicum sites.
Prerequisite: PSYC 24 and permission through department website.

PSYC 84.05

The Power of Beliefs

In 16F at 10A Luke Chang

How do beliefs affect clinical outcomes?  This course provides an in-depth examination of the role of beliefs and expectations in the manifestation of psychological symptoms and their treatment.  Topics to be covered include the psychological and biological bases of pharmacological placebo effects, the mechanisms underlying psychotherapy (e.g., patient and provider expectations), and also how cultural expectations impact how psychological symptoms are experienced (e.g., hallucinations, delusions, and somatization).
Prerequisite: PSYC 1 or PSYC 6, and PSYC 50.01 or PYSC 54.03, and permission through department website.

PSYC 86.01

Selective Developmental Deficits

In 16F at 2A Bradley Duchaine

Cognitive neuropsychology relies on selective deficits to shed light on the organization of the brain.  In the past, nearly all selective deficits reported in the neuropsychological literature involved brain-damaged patients who lost particular abilities, but many selective deficits due to failures of development have been identified in recent years.  These include deficits affecting computations concerned with color, faces, objects, spatial abilities, music, language, reading, number, and memory.  This course will discuss the theoretical basis of selective deficits, examine the cognitive and neural profiles of particular selective developmental deficits, and consider the more general implications of selective developmental deficits and the research opportunities they present.
Permission through the department website.  Approved elective for the Neuroscience major/minor.

PSYC 86.04

Advanced Neuroscience Seminar and Annual Meeting

In 16F at 10A — David Bucci

THIS COURSE IS NOW FULL - WAITLIST ONLY
This seminar will explore topics and issues that are on the cutting edge of neuroscience. Topics will be selected from among those that are the subject of special lectures, panels, and keynote addresses scheduled for the upcoming Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (November 12-16 in San Diego, CA).  During each class meeting, we will read and discuss several articles on one of the topics.  By November 12 we will be intimately familiar with the content of the scheduled presentations.  We will then travel to the Annual Meeting in San Diego and attend these presentations.
Permission through the department website.  Approved elective for the Neuroscience major/minor.

PSYC 88

Independent Psychology Research

The course is designed to enable specifically qualified students, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory or field research under the direction of a faculty member.  Students may take up to three terms of Independent Research. However, no more than two terms of 88, 89, or a combination of 88s and 89s may count toward the eight required courses for the major. Normally a student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 both overall and in the major to enroll.  Consult the Independent and Honors Research page for further information, including the required permission form for enrolling PSYC 88.

Notes:

  • This course may NOT be used to satisfy the 60- or above requirements for the major.
  • Non-majors may request exemption from normal prerequisites and other requirements of PSYC 88.
  • Prerequisite: PSYC 1 or 6, PSYC 10, and PSYC 11; and completed permission form including the advisor's signature.

PSYC 89

Honors Psychology Research

This course is designed to enable especially qualified students, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory or field research under the direction of a faculty member. Students may take two or three terms of Honors Research, but no more than two terms of 88, 89, or a combination of 88s and 89s may count toward the eight required courses for the major. This course may not be used to fulfill the upper-level (60 or above) major requirement. A student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.30 in the major and 3.0 overall to enroll and must enroll before the end of the Fall term of their Senior year.  Consult the Psychology Honors page for further information, including the required checklist for enrolling in PSYC 89.

PSYC 90

Independent Neuroscience Research

This course is designed to enable Neuroscience majors to engage in independent laboratory research under the direction of a neuroscience faculty member. This course is suitable to use for your culminating experience, but cannot be used to fulfill the elective requirement for the Neuroscience major. Students may take up to two terms of independent research. Students are required to write a final report of their research.

Prerequisite: PSYC 6 and 10. A completed PDF iconChecklist for Independent Study form complete with the signature of the advisor should be submitted to the PBS Department office. The Neuroscience Steering Committee will evaluate and approve the application.

PSYC 91

Honors Neuroscience Research

This course is designed to enable especially qualified Neuroscience majors, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory research under the direction of a neuroscience faculty member. Students must take at least two terms of Psychology 91. A student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.30 in the major and 3.00 overall to enroll and must enroll by the Fall term of the senior year.  Consult the Neuroscience Honors page for further information, including the required checklist for enrolling in PSYC 91.