Fall 2014

PSYC 60

Principles of Human Brain Mapping with fMRI

Brain Mapping with fMRI

14 F 2AWilliam Kelley

This course is designed to introduce students to the theoretical and practical issues involved in conducting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments of cognitive and behaviorally-related brain activity. Participants will gain an understanding of the physiological principles underlying the fMRI signal change, as well as the considerations for experimental design. The course will include firsthand exposure to the scanning environment and data collection procedures. Participants will be provided conceptual and hands-on experience with image processing and statistical analysis. At the completion of this course, it is expected that participants will be prepared to critique, design and conduct fMRI studies; appreciate limitations and potentials of current fMRI methods and techniques; and better understand the broad range of expertise required in an fMRI research program. The course is designed to provide the participant with intensive, hands-on instruction. As a result, enrollment in the course will be limited to 12 people. Knowledge of MR physics, signal processing, or the UNIX/Linux operating system is not a prerequisite. Permission through the department website.

 

COURSE CLOSED

PSYC 65 (2 sections)

Systems Neuroscience with Laboratory

In 14F:10—Jeffrey Taube, Robert Maue

The primary focus of this course is the physiological basis of behavior from a systems perspective. Such topics as localization of function, neural models, and the physiological bases of sensory/motor systems, learning/memory, and spatial cognition are considered. The laboratory introduces the student to the anatomy and physiology of the mammalian central nervous system and to some of the principal techniques used in systems and behavioral neuroscience.Laboratory sections will be assigned during the first week of class . Prerequisite: One of the following three (Psych  6, Psyc  26 or Biology 34) and permission through the department website. Dist: SLA.

 

 

 

FOURSE CLOSED

PSYC 80

Neuroscience of Reward

In 14F: 2AKyle Smith

Much of the life of humans and other animals revolves around reward, whether engaging in basic pleasures like food and sex or enjoying more complex things like music. This course will introduce conceptual frameworks to understand reward as a phenomenon that is distinct from other features of goal-directed behavior. We will then discuss recent advances in neuroscience research that are helping us to understand the basic brain mechanisms that make things pleasurable, including anatomical pathways, neurotransmitter systems, and dynamics of neural activity. Prerequisite: Psyc 6, and Psyc 26 or Psyc 45 or Bio 34.

 

PSYC 85

Cognitive Neuroscience Seminar: Top-down processing and brain plasticityBrain

In 14F:2A—Won Mok Shim

This course will explore current issues and findings in the field of cognitive neuroscience. Information in the brain has been traditionally viewed as hard-coded. However, research has shown that activity in many of the brain areas is not fixed but changes with experience, and does not hold raw sensory data but is often modulated by top-down influences, such as attention and interpretation.  In this course, we will consider how the organization of the human brain changes with experience.  We will also explore the variety of high-level information that can be found in the brain. Topics include attention, memory, imagery, consciousness, cross-modal interactions, plasticity in the brain, and brain-machine interface. Students will read and discuss the current research findings in the field and develop research ideas of their own. Permission through the department website.  

PSYC 86

Face Perception

14 F: 10AMaria Gobbini

Faces are an endless source of information for non-verbal communication. Through faces we recognize identity and infer the emotional and mental states as well as the direction of attention of others. This course will focus on the neural mechanisms for face perception and the automaticity of retrieval of social cues conveyed by faces. In addition to weekly reading and student-led discussions, the students are required to write a paper at the end of the course.  Permission through the department website.

 

PSYC 88

Independent Research

The course is designed to enable specifically qualified students, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory or field research under the direction of a faculty member.  Students may take up to three terms of Independent Research. However, no more than two terms of 88, 89, or a combination of 88s and 89s may count toward the eight required courses for the major. Normally a student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 both overall and in the major to enroll.

Notes:

 

PSYC 89

Honors Research

This course is designed to enable especially qualified students, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory or field research under the direction of a faculty member. Students may take two or three terms of Honors Research, but no more than two terms of 88, 89, or a combination of 88s and 89s may count toward the eight required courses for the major. This course may not be used to fulfill the upper-level (60 or above) major requirement. A student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.30 in the major and 3.0 overall to enroll and must enroll before the end of the Fall term of their Senior year. Honors theses will be evaluated by a two-person Thesis Committee approved by the Undergraduate Committee. Thesis Committee members must be identified prior to the student signing up for Psych 89. The Thesis Committee must include a regular member of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences faculty. The other individual, if not a regular member of PBS, must have an active academic appointment (e.g., Research Associate, Research Assistant Professor, Medical School Faculty, Faculty in other departments of the College, for instance). Either Committee member may serve as the primary advisor. The two members of the Thesis Committee may not be in the same laboratory. The Thesis Committee will read and evaluate the thesis and oral presentation, and make recommendations to the Undergraduate Committee regarding the awarding of Honors or High Honors. In addition, all Honors students will present their work in a departmental symposium at the conclusion of the Spring term. The Thesis Committee will also recommend in writing meritorious students to the Undergraduate Committee for consideration for the various departmental prizes. Two terms of this course are required of those who seek to graduate with Honors in Psychology.

Potential sources of funds for independent research may be found in the description of The Filene and Benner Fellowships for Independent Research and on the Undergraduate Advising & Research web site.

Prerequisite: Psych 1, 10 and 11. A sixty level course is strongly recommended. Students should check well in advance with their faculty advisor for additional prerequisites. Written permission from the advisor, and then written permission from the Chairman of the Undergraduate Committee (for 09-10, Professor Catherine Cramer).

Checklist for enrolling in Honors Independent Research, PSYC 89. Be sure to read the Expectations and Procedures for Honors in Psychology, to help you design and conduct a successful Honors Major.

 

PSYC 90

Independent Neuyroscience Researcj

This course is designed to enable Neuroscience majors to engage in independent laboratory research under the direction of a neuroscience faculty member. This course is suitable to use for your culminating experience, but cannot be used to fulfill the elective requirement for the Neuroscience major. Students may take up to two terms of independent research. Students are required to write a final report of their research.

Prerequisite: Psychology 6, and 10. A completed Checklist for Independent Study form along with the signed permission from the advisor on the form should be submitted to the PBS Department office. The Neuroscience Steering Committee will evaluate and approve the application.

 

PSYC 91

Honors Neuroscience Research

This course is designed to enable especially qualified Neuroscience majors, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory research under the direction of a neuroscience faculty member. Students must take at least two terms of Psychology 91. A student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.30 in the major and 3.00 overall to enroll and must enroll by the Fall term of the senior year. The honors thesis will be evaluated by a two-person thesis committee approved by the Neuroscience Steering Committee. Thesis committee members must be identified prior to the student signing up for Psychology 91. The thesis committee must include a regular faculty member of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. The other individual must have an active academic appointment at Dartmouth. A prospectus of proposed research is due by the end of the Fall term for approval by the Neuroscience Steering Committee. The student is expected to submit a written thesis, give a public presentation and pass an oral examination administered by the thesis committee. The thesis committee will make recommendations to the Neuroscience Steering Committee regarding the awarding of Honors or High Honors.

Prerequisite: Psychology 6, and 10. A 60s level course is strongly recommended. Students should check well in advance with their faculty advisor for additional prerequisites.  A completed Checklist for Honor's Thesis form along with the signed permission.