News & Events

  • New Dartmouth study of chronic dieters suggests brain disruptions weaken will power.

    A new Dartmouth neuroimaging study suggests chronic dieters overeat when the regions of their brain that balance impulsive behavior and self-control become disrupted, decreasing their capacity to resist temptation.

    The findings, which appear in the journal Psychological Science, indicate that...

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  • Popular Science features new Dartmouth research that focuses on what the brain’s “mental workplace” looks like when people manipulate images in their mind.

    “Our lab is very interested in the kind of flexible cognitive behaviors that humans have,” Alex Schlegel, a graduate student in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, and lead author of the study, tells Popular Science. “We can learn new things, we can think of new concepts, seeing things from different perspectives—a...

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  • Bill Platt

    Neuroscience plays a starring role in a two-part series Brains on Trial With Alan Alda, airing on PBS Wednesday, September 11, and Wednesday, September 18, from 10 to 11 p.m., a project that Dartmouth Professor Thalia Wheatley, an expert in brain science and social intelligence, worked on as a consultant.

    Brains on Trial centers on the trial of a fictional crime: a robbery staged in a convenience store. A...

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  • In a story about “super recognizers”—people who have an exceptional ability to remember faces—ScienceNews turns for comment to Dartmouth’s Bradley Duchaine.

    Duchaine, an associate professor of psychological and brain sciences, and colleagues in England are studying super recognizers to understand how some people are able to recognize nearly everyone they’ve ever seen, the magazine writes. Knowledge gained from such studies may aid in police work and...

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  • What if the brain had a light switch that could be flipped to turn off a bad habit?

    Research by Assistant Professor Kyle Smith, who joined the faculty of Dartmouth’s Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences last month, has found just that in lab rats. Smith and others have identified brain cells involved in habit formation and inhibition. Researchers introduced DNA for photosensitive molecules into the brain’s cortex to make specific neurons...

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  • Joe Blumberg

    As the daughter of two Hershey, Pa., physicians, Rachel Abendroth ’13 surprised no one when she entered Dartmouth as an aspiring physician. “I was certain that medicine was my path, and felt I’d lost my footing when I discovered that I was neither particularly interested in nor gifted at biology and chemistry classes,” she says.

    Having taken some introductory neuroscience classes and an education class based on developmental disorders in children,...

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  • In a story about a rare disorder that makes it difficult for people to recognize even familiar places, NBC’s The Today Show interviews Dartmouth’s Jeffrey Taube, who studies the navigational processes used by rats.

    Taube, a professor of psychological and brain sciences, says “the rat’s—and probably people’s—brain cells fire like a compass. There is a neuron that fires any time the rat heads north and another that fires when the rat...

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  • Joseph Blumberg

    Two Dartmouth students have their sights set on very different kinds of science, courtesy of the National Science Foundation (NSF). As recipients of NSF Graduate Research Fellowships, Eshin Jolly will pursue graduate studies in cognitive neuroscience at Dartmouth while Aryeh Drager ’12 will head to Colorado State University to study atmospheric science.

    “It is a pretty prestigious thing to have bestowed upon you your...

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  • Dartmouth’s Peter Tse ’84, an associate professor of psychological and brain sciences, says he has identified a neurological basis for free will in the human brain, challenging a majority opinion that has dominated neuroscience for the last 40 years.

    Measurements of human brain signals on the level of neurons and synapses have long shown that acts of will are preceded by a buildup of neural activity in the brain. These signals can begin up to...

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  • Joe Blumberg

    Music and movement reflect the rhythm of life, stirring human emotions in societies around the world. Even infants display signs of the interconnectedness of music and movement as they bounce up and down to musical rhythms. Music and movement might be characterized as two sides of the same coin—the coin being emotion.

    Gaining an understanding of the connections between these behavioral expressions is a quest Dartmouth researchers have undertaken. The...

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