News & Events

  • In a story about a rare disorder that makes it difficult for people to recognize even familiar places, NBC’s The Today Show interviews Dartmouth’s Jeffrey Taube, who studies the navigational processes used by rats.

    Taube, a professor of psychological and brain sciences, says “the rat’s—and probably people’s—brain cells fire like a compass. There is a neuron that fires any time the rat heads north and another that fires when the rat...

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  • Joseph Blumberg

    Two Dartmouth students have their sights set on very different kinds of science, courtesy of the National Science Foundation (NSF). As recipients of NSF Graduate Research Fellowships, Eshin Jolly will pursue graduate studies in cognitive neuroscience at Dartmouth while Aryeh Drager ’12 will head to Colorado State University to study atmospheric science.

    “It is a pretty prestigious thing to have bestowed upon you your...

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  • Dartmouth’s Peter Tse ’84, an associate professor of psychological and brain sciences, says he has identified a neurological basis for free will in the human brain, challenging a majority opinion that has dominated neuroscience for the last 40 years.

    Measurements of human brain signals on the level of neurons and synapses have long shown that acts of will are preceded by a buildup of neural activity in the brain. These signals can begin up to...

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  • Joe Blumberg

    Music and movement reflect the rhythm of life, stirring human emotions in societies around the world. Even infants display signs of the interconnectedness of music and movement as they bounce up and down to musical rhythms. Music and movement might be characterized as two sides of the same coin—the coin being emotion.

    Gaining an understanding of the connections between these behavioral expressions is a quest Dartmouth researchers have undertaken. The...

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